Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™ http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com The 216.6 mile Cascade Lakes Relay is an overnight team running event for up to 12 runners. Thu, 12 Oct 2017 22:54:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.2 Hello world! http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/2013/11/11/hello-world/ Mon, 11 Nov 2013 23:09:40 +0000 http://www.cascadelakesrelay.org/?p=1 Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

The post Hello world! appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

The post Hello world! appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
Running the First Leg, a guest post by Sole Train's Greg L. http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/2013/08/09/running-the-first-leg-a-guest-post-by-sole-trains-greg-l/ Fri, 09 Aug 2013 22:12:10 +0000 http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/?p=4127   Each time I have run the Cascade Lakes Relay, I have wished I had something to record the voices in my head (no not ‘those’ voices) as they tried to describe the event, the landscape and the experience of a Relay through the exquisite world that is Southern Oregon. To put this all in context, this year, my fifth time participating in the Cascade Lakes Relay and I came back after the first one because of the sights, sounds and scenery that assaulted the senses from the first hours of leaving Diamond Lake to the final stretches as we rolled into Bend and the finish line. Along the way taking in snowy peaks and the amazingly blue lakes along the Cascade Lake highway. 2013 marked my fifth year of participating in this event, and my new red shirt was quite the surprise as I had not realized that I’d been at it that long.   So, trying to capture my thoughts and feelings and the privilege of running an event such as this, I went back to some of those voices. The ones that have not completely gone away, despite me sitting at my desk and the noise of the regular work day.   The van is loaded and Van 2 team members have it down to a fine art. No extraneous food or personal items that don’t factor into the event. Nothing that we have to dig through to get to what’s necessary. Cots and a collapsible chair, because you know there is no scrimping on comfort . The cooler is a sensible size and the baggage kept to a minimum. Zip lock and Eagle creek bags keep everything in handy grab sized … Continue reading

The post Running the First Leg, a guest post by Sole Train's Greg L. appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
team sole train

Sole Train at the finish

 

Each time I have run the Cascade Lakes Relay, I have wished I had something to record the voices in my head (no not ‘those’ voices) as they tried to describe the event, the landscape and the experience of a Relay through the exquisite world that is Southern Oregon. To put this all in context, this year, my fifth time participating in the Cascade Lakes Relay and I came back after the first one because of the sights, sounds and scenery that assaulted the senses from the first hours of leaving Diamond Lake to the final stretches as we rolled into Bend and the finish line. Along the way taking in snowy peaks and the amazingly blue lakes along the Cascade Lake highway. 2013 marked my fifth year of participating in this event, and my new red shirt was quite the surprise as I had not realized that I’d been at it that long.

 

So, trying to capture my thoughts and feelings and the privilege of running an event such as this, I went back to some of those voices. The ones that have not completely gone away, despite me sitting at my desk and the noise of the regular work day.

 

The van is loaded and Van 2 team members have it down to a fine art. No extraneous food or personal items that don’t factor into the event. Nothing that we have to dig through to get to what’s necessary. Cots and a collapsible chair, because you know there is no scrimping on comfort . The cooler is a sensible size and the baggage kept to a minimum. Zip lock and Eagle creek bags keep everything in handy grab sized packages. Even my Mountain Hardware down jacket comes along, in a tiny stuff sack of course.

 

Our first challenge of the event was while loading up; we realized that the pens we bought to decorate the van were next to worthless. Some broken and leaking profusely while others were unable to provide anything more  than a dribble of the fluids within. In the spirit of the event we pushed through and managed to get something on the windows and headed out to the first exchange point along  Highway 97 and onto the Silver Lake road to meet up with Van 1.

 

Up on the high desert plateau the air is dry. The sky, a deep blue, decorated with white clouds moving lazily across it leaving dark shadows that tracked their movement. Each blocking the sun periodically to provide a brief but welcome  cooling as they silently slipped off into the distance to be consumes in the haze. The constant shape shifting leaving you marveled at the ability for something to large and mobile to float and glide through the sky. The smell of the high desert in the senses, pine rich and sweet permeates everywhere as the tree’s bake in the heat.

 

My first leg kicked off at mid to late Friday afternoon, and the sun was not yet dropping low in the sky, but the shadows beginning to lengthen slightly, and the countryside quieted by the days heat and waiting pensively for the cool of the evening to come. That moment in the day when everything is waiting patiently for the sun to finally drop so that the evening can begin.
 

9441916706_e2e60d8a19_c

The windy road in to Silver Lake.

 

The first quarter mile, uphill, my heart rate climbing steadily before I crested the rise and began the gradual decent on the other side. The road, initially straight, began to twist and turn through a fantastic landscape. To my left, the hill rose a couple of hundred feet. Covered in brush, stunted pine’s, dead trees and a walls of volcanic rock that had been sheered from the ground and left to cool in these long slabs that stair stepped down to where I ran. The ground, sandy and unforgiving, home to the straw colored grass that gave the scenery it’s distinctly dry and parched look. Barbed wire, rusted and sagging in places, all held tight to posts made of rock piles bound into a column stretched out into the distance. To my right, the valley dropped away, past the odd ranch, brush and sparse forest before going back up to the ridge on the other side.

 

In front of me was even more astonishing. Below, the flat valley floor stretched out into what seemed like eternity. An endless plateau of the same straw colored earth that met the blue and white sky in an indistinct line  of dirty white and grey. Dark shadows from the clouds spotted here and there. Large buttes and rolling hills, black and solid lined the sides of the valley left and right funneling the view and drawing the eye to the far distance. I was alone for the most part, in a window of space and time where I was the only person. Hardly a car, van and certainly no other runners, just me, alone with my thoughts, the sound of my breathing, dry and labored in the altitude and low humidity of high desert. The pounding of my shoes on the hot tarmac, the clicks and pops of crickets and beetles in the tree’s, occasional  calls from a hawk and the drumming of my heart in my head. Solitude and freedom, movement and persistence, remoteness and connectedness, belonging….this, right here, right now is why I love this state, love to run and love to be outside. I’m four hours from home, running through a completely different landscape. Dry, sparse, yet bursting with surprise and showered in beauty.

 

Off to my right, a ranch appears. The green tin roofs standing out against the subtle colors of nature. Nothing moves in the heat. Yet still I pound out the miles, one foot driven in front of the other, oblivious to the motion, awed by the world around me. More rock, more road, more tree’s. And then, like an oasis in this hot dry place, a river. An air conditioned space surrounded by tree’s. Small birds, grass, green and lush. A ribbon of life carving through the unforgiving landscape.

 

The exchange appears in the distance, only a short while later it’s all over. The real world crashes in.  Cars, Vans, people, noise…..but I am still out there in my head, breathing in the hot air, feeling the road beneath my feet. Can I get a do over? Re-live the run and the experience. Feel the world around me and connect with that inner self that watches, listens and gives the voices words.

 

The next runner, off to another exchange. The night is coming there are more legs to run.

 

VAN 2

 

The post Running the First Leg, a guest post by Sole Train's Greg L. appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
Cascade Lakes Relay 2013: The One Where The Relay Tries To Take Me Down http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/2013/08/07/cascade-lakes-relay-2013-the-one-where-the-relay-tries-to-take-me-down/ Thu, 08 Aug 2013 02:20:27 +0000 http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/?p=4104 We would love to share your race recaps with our readers. If you have posted a write-up of the 2013 Cascade Lakes Relay and are willing to have it be a guest post, please shoot me an email at teri@cascaderelays.com. * * * by Teri Smith   When Scott and Carrie asked me to join the team last February, I felt pretty confident that I knew what I was in for. Years of running the Cascade Lakes Relay had made me tough, ready for the physical and mental challenges my favorite relay would surely throw my way. After all, I had conquered leg 2a and 2b in one fell swoop. I had submitted myself to the choking heat of leg 5. I was a veteran of sleepless nights and raging mosquitos. Surely being on the race staff could not be as rough as running itself, right?   You probably know where this is going.   Helping put on the CLR kicked my ass.   Completely.   Darn hubris.     At a particularly low moment, after having lost wi-fi connection for what seemed to be the thousandth time, I wondered how Scott, Carrie and the rest of the crew could do this year after year. They must be superhuman, I concluded, made of something other than whatever constituted my internal makeup.   I wondered how I would be able to continue.   But as so often happens when you are starting out on that third leg, exhausted by too many miles of running, red vines, and lack of sleep, you find the strength to bring it home. I started to rally.   And I figured out how they keep doing this year after year.   … Continue reading

The post Cascade Lakes Relay 2013: The One Where The Relay Tries To Take Me Down appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
We would love to share your race recaps with our readers. If you have posted a write-up of the 2013 Cascade Lakes Relay and are willing to have it be a guest post, please shoot me an email at teri@cascaderelays.com.

* * *

by Teri Smith
 

When Scott and Carrie asked me to join the team last February, I felt pretty confident that I knew what I was in for. Years of running the Cascade Lakes Relay had made me tough, ready for the physical and mental challenges my favorite relay would surely throw my way. After all, I had conquered leg 2a and 2b in one fell swoop. I had submitted myself to the choking heat of leg 5. I was a veteran of sleepless nights and raging mosquitos. Surely being on the race staff could not be as rough as running itself, right?

 

You probably know where this is going.

 

Helping put on the CLR kicked my ass.

 

Completely.

 

Darn hubris.

 

9438575095_7a35a2ba62_b

 

At a particularly low moment, after having lost wi-fi connection for what seemed to be the thousandth time, I wondered how Scott, Carrie and the rest of the crew could do this year after year. They must be superhuman, I concluded, made of something other than whatever constituted my internal makeup.

 

I wondered how I would be able to continue.

 

But as so often happens when you are starting out on that third leg, exhausted by too many miles of running, red vines, and lack of sleep, you find the strength to bring it home. I started to rally.

 

And I figured out how they keep doing this year after year.

 

The answer is you.

9438525635_2565f17dcb_b

 

9438648911_0978c22d13_b
 

The runners, walkers and volunteers who make up the Cascade Lakes Relay are some of the coolest people on the planet.  People who will give you the water out of their cooler, the blinking red lights out of their supplies, the shirt of their back if you just ask.

 9439123039_11b194afe3_b
 
You’re silly, spirited, friendly, generous. You’re (mostly) calm, competitive, and kind. You sign up to be Water Ambassadors so you can help your fellow runner. You bring donations of food to send to the Community Kitchen. Some of you even give little gifts to the volunteers.

 

I’ve said it before, and I will say it again. This relay is something special. It truly is. We have the best participants, the best volunteers, the best race staff. I would put them up against any race in the world.  I feel lucky to have been able to be on both sides of the equation, and I am looking forward to many more years working with the CLR staff and volunteers to bring our favorite people the best experience possible.

 

Next year, I’ll know to draw on your cheers, your team spirit, and your enthusiasm early on during the weekend.  You’ll give me the strength without me even having to ask.
 
Registration for 2014 will start on October 1st; we can’t wait to see you next year.
 

The post Cascade Lakes Relay 2013: The One Where The Relay Tries To Take Me Down appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
Meet CLRG Staff Member Emily! http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/2013/07/25/meet-clrg-staff-member-emily/ Thu, 25 Jul 2013 21:46:46 +0000 http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/?p=3865 Look for Emily out on the costume contest leg or getting up to wacky hijinx along the course. Our Director of Fun & Games loves to have fun.      What’s your job with the CLR/S2S? Director of Fun and Games for CLR and S2S   What song are you embarrassed to admit you can’t help dancing to? Glamorous – I have a station on Pandora based on that song that’s full of songs I’m embarrassed to be listening to but love dancing around my house to.   What food do you crave in the wee hours of the night during a relay? Peanut Butter & Jelly Sandwiches   What superhero do you sometimes wish you could be? Wonder Woman   What’s your least favorite running or walking weather? Windy – I’d rather walk or run in the rain.   What’s your favorite line from a movie? “As you wish…” That’s more of a line from my favorite movie.   What’s your favorite spot on the CLR course? The view of the mountains from exchange point 5.   What’s your favorite spot on the S2S course? The finish line in Sandpoint. It’s gorgeous! A great spot to finish the relay.   What vegetable did you hate to eat as a kid? I don’t think I hated vegetables when I was younger but I didn’t have brussels sprouts until I was 22 years old because my parents hated them when they were growing up.   What’s your favorite post race beverage? Chocolate milk or beer   Why do you love working for the CLR and S2S? There are so many reasons I love working for CLR and S2S. Here are just a few…I love working for … Continue reading

The post Meet CLRG Staff Member Emily! appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
Look for Emily out on the costume contest leg or getting up to wacky hijinx along the course. Our Director of Fun & Games loves to have fun. 
 

Emily

 
What’s your job with the CLR/S2S?
Director of Fun and Games for CLR and S2S
 
What song are you embarrassed to admit you can’t help dancing to?
Glamorous – I have a station on Pandora based on that song that’s full of songs I’m embarrassed to be listening to but love dancing around my house to.
 
What food do you crave in the wee hours of the night during a relay?
Peanut Butter & Jelly Sandwiches
 
What superhero do you sometimes wish you could be?
Wonder Woman
 
What’s your least favorite running or walking weather?
Windy – I’d rather walk or run in the rain.
 
What’s your favorite line from a movie?
“As you wish…” That’s more of a line from my favorite movie.
 
What’s your favorite spot on the CLR course?
The view of the mountains from exchange point 5.
 
What’s your favorite spot on the S2S course?
The finish line in Sandpoint. It’s gorgeous! A great spot to finish the relay.
 
What vegetable did you hate to eat as a kid?
I don’t think I hated vegetables when I was younger but I didn’t have brussels sprouts until I was 22 years old because my parents hated them when they were growing up.
 
What’s your favorite post race beverage?
Chocolate milk or beer
 
Why do you love working for the CLR and S2S?
There are so many reasons I love working for CLR and S2S. Here are just a few…I love working for CLR and S2S because it’s different from my other job as a 3rd grade teacher. I love the fact that I get to travel and see places I’ve never been before. I enjoy being a part of the running community by working for the race. I also enjoy having something that Will (my fiance) and I can experience together. I was wearing a CLR long sleeve shirt when he proposed on the beach in Lincoln City in May! I love the friendships I’ve made through working for the races. The staff is full of kind, positive, energetic people. I love working for Scott and Carrie. They are wonderful people who are amazing at producing quality events!
 

The post Meet CLRG Staff Member Emily! appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
Top 7 Tips For Being An Awesome Relay Teammate http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/2013/07/23/top-7-tips-for-being-an-awesome-relay-teammate/ Tue, 23 Jul 2013 14:59:51 +0000 http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/?p=3836 Relays are a special kind of running race. Sure, it helps if you can run fast, but honestly, the best relay teammates are not necessarily the ones with the fastest splits. Conquering a overnight relay requires a wide skillset, including the ability to endure sleep deprivation and van funk with a positive attitude. If you are new to the relay game, or if you’re just wanting to brush up your teammate skills, here’s our guide to being the most awesome relay teammate ever.     1. Be flexible. Relays are tough, physically and emotionally, and you need to be able to adapt as you go.  If you are a person who likes to control a situation, try and let go as much of that need as possible during race weekend. Your team captain may need to change the plan on the fly, or your runner may get lost and you might not have time to prepare for your leg the way you’d like. Do your best to roll with the punches, and your teammates will appreciate you for it.   2. Show your enthusiasm. Cheer loudly for your teammates, rattle the cowbell, plan funny photo opportunities. The more fun you are having, the more fun your teammates are probably having. Don’t be afraid to be silly or childish – that’s kind of what this relay thing is all about.   3. Be prepared. Nothing is more frustrating than a teammate who needs some of your bandaids…and sunscreen…and gatorade…and headphones…well, you get the picture. Use a packing list and make sure you bring everything you need for the weekend. Better yet, be generous with your stuff when your teammates don’t have something they need, and then … Continue reading

The post Top 7 Tips For Being An Awesome Relay Teammate appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
Relays are a special kind of running race. Sure, it helps if you can run fast, but honestly, the best relay teammates are not necessarily the ones with the fastest splits. Conquering a overnight relay requires a wide skillset, including the ability to endure sleep deprivation and van funk with a positive attitude. If you are new to the relay game, or if you’re just wanting to brush up your teammate skills, here’s our guide to being the most awesome relay teammate ever.

 

leg 20

 

1. Be flexible.

Relays are tough, physically and emotionally, and you need to be able to adapt as you go.  If you are a person who likes to control a situation, try and let go as much of that need as possible during race weekend. Your team captain may need to change the plan on the fly, or your runner may get lost and you might not have time to prepare for your leg the way you’d like. Do your best to roll with the punches, and your teammates will appreciate you for it.

 

2. Show your enthusiasm.

Cheer loudly for your teammates, rattle the cowbell, plan funny photo opportunities. The more fun you are having, the more fun your teammates are probably having. Don’t be afraid to be silly or childish – that’s kind of what this relay thing is all about.

 

3. Be prepared.

Nothing is more frustrating than a teammate who needs some of your bandaids…and sunscreen…and gatorade…and headphones…well, you get the picture. Use a packing list and make sure you bring everything you need for the weekend. Better yet, be generous with your stuff when your teammates don’t have something they need, and then you’ll be the hero.

There is a caution with this suggestion though. Don’t be the guy who shows up with the bag the size of the entire car carrier. Compress your stuff and pack smart!

 

4. Know your abilities.

As long as you are honest with how fast (or slow) you can move with your teammates, you’ll be okay. But don’t come in promising 6 minutes miles, run 1 at that pace, blow out your hamstrings, and then have to spend the rest of the race injured. Be realistic about what you can do and conserve a bit so that you can run all three legs.

 

5. Remember that everyone is tired at 3 am.

Yes, we all get tired at 3 in the morning. Hopping out of the van to support the active runner or walker with water and cheers is probably the last thing that any of us want to do. But sleeping in the back of the van while you let your teammates do all of the work is not the best way to win friends and influence people. Suck it up and help out your runner; you can sleep when it’s over.

 

6. Help cover relay expenses.

Relays are expensive, and often the team captain gets stuck with the bill. I’ve known folks who have had to pay hundreds of dollars extra because teammates never paid up. If you want to be a good teammate, make sure you throw in your share.

 

clr sat 2 207

 

7. View the relay as an adventure.

If you can keep the perspective that the entire experience is an adventure, you can stay positive no matter what happens. Van stuck on a tree stump? It’s an adventure! (Yes, this happened to our team last year.) Team mates melting down at each other over a miscommunication? It’s an adventure! (Yes, I’ve had that happen too.) No teammate at the exchange for you to hand off to for 20 minutes? It’s an adventure! (You betcha it happened to me.) I always remind myself that whatever is happening is going to be a great story some day.

 

So there you have it, folks. Our seven best tips for being a great relay teammate. Whether you’ve been with your team since the very first year, or you are hopping on a team at the very last minute, keep these ideas in mind as you head out on the course. Your team will thank you for it!

 

The post Top 7 Tips For Being An Awesome Relay Teammate appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
Team Captain Webinar Recording http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/2013/07/21/team-captain-webinar-recording/ Mon, 22 Jul 2013 04:19:15 +0000 http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/?p=3829 Slowly but surely we are figuring out the technologies for putting on these meetings. Tonight, we made a recording, but after opening up the file, I realized that it is just an audio recording. Regardless, there is a lot of good information in the hour long call, and we encourage you to give it a listen. The file is located here: http://www.cascadelakesrelay.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/New-Meeting-7-21-13-7.01-PM.mov Once the file downloads, doubleclick on it to listen in. If you have any questions about the relay, please do not hesitate to email me at teri@cascaderelays.com.

The post Team Captain Webinar Recording appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
Slowly but surely we are figuring out the technologies for putting on these meetings. Tonight, we made a recording, but after opening up the file, I realized that it is just an audio recording. Regardless, there is a lot of good information in the hour long call, and we encourage you to give it a listen.

The file is located here: http://www.cascadelakesrelay.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/New-Meeting-7-21-13-7.01-PM.mov

Once the file downloads, doubleclick on it to listen in.

If you have any questions about the relay, please do not hesitate to email me at teri@cascaderelays.com.

The post Team Captain Webinar Recording appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
A Complete Packing List for the Cascade Lakes Relay http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/2013/07/18/a-complete-packing-list-for-the-cascade-lakes-relay/ Fri, 19 Jul 2013 01:09:27 +0000 http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/?p=3822 Wondering what to bring along on your CLR adventure? Here’s a complete packing list to make sure you don’t forget a thing: Complete Packing List

The post A Complete Packing List for the Cascade Lakes Relay appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
Wondering what to bring along on your CLR adventure? Here’s a complete packing list to make sure you don’t forget a thing:

Complete Packing List

The post A Complete Packing List for the Cascade Lakes Relay appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
The Importance of Hydration http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/2013/07/18/the-importance-of-hydration/ Thu, 18 Jul 2013 19:44:10 +0000 http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/?p=3810 Water.     We are surrounded by it as we run the Cascade Lakes Highway, and yet the lack of it in our bodies can spell trouble to the hardworking athlete. Water can be the difference between a good race and a bad one – the difference between heat exhaustion and just being hot. Do you know how to use water to your advantage during a relay?   Hydration   Do you need to drink a ton of water in the days leading up to the relay? Probably not.  As long as your urine is normal, keep doing what you’re doing. You can’t cram in water; your body will just get rid of the excess. So spend your energy packing or studying your legs!   Everyone knows that hydration while running is important. While recent research suggests that drinking to thirst is enough to keep our bodies in balance, it is still important to make sure we have water available when our bodies ask for it. You should plan to carry water during the hottest legs (between noon and 5 pm), especially if your run is unsupported (legs #1, 4, 26, 36). If you are not going to carry water, have your team stop every mile to check on you. If you feel thirsty, drink. Your body will repay you by feeling better later.   Hydrating after the run is just as important as hydrating during the run. Let thirst be your guide, and keep a water bottle near. Be sure to keep extra water in your vehicle – after you leave Hwy 97 on Friday, there are no provisions until you reach Silver Lake. On Saturday, once you leave La Pine, you will only … Continue reading

The post The Importance of Hydration appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
Water.

 

DSC_0166

 

We are surrounded by it as we run the Cascade Lakes Highway, and yet the lack of it in our bodies can spell trouble to the hardworking athlete. Water can be the difference between a good race and a bad one – the difference between heat exhaustion and just being hot. Do you know how to use water to your advantage during a relay?

 

Hydration
 
Do you need to drink a ton of water in the days leading up to the relay? Probably not.  As long as your urine is normal, keep doing what you’re doing. You can’t cram in water; your body will just get rid of the excess. So spend your energy packing or studying your legs!

 
Everyone knows that hydration while running is important. While recent research suggests that drinking to thirst is enough to keep our bodies in balance, it is still important to make sure we have water available when our bodies ask for it. You should plan to carry water during the hottest legs (between noon and 5 pm), especially if your run is unsupported (legs #1, 4, 26, 36). If you are not going to carry water, have your team stop every mile to check on you. If you feel thirsty, drink. Your body will repay you by feeling better later.

 

Hydrating after the run is just as important as hydrating during the run. Let thirst be your guide, and keep a water bottle near. Be sure to keep extra water in your vehicle – after you leave Hwy 97 on Friday, there are no provisions until you reach Silver Lake. On Saturday, once you leave La Pine, you will only have two small resorts to find any provisions at. Stock up.

 

Don’t force yourself to drink, though, especially if your stomach feels sloshy. It is possible to drink too much water and to cause problems with overhydration. Your body works hard to keep a balance between water and sodium, so if you’re taking in a lot of water, you’re washing a lot of sodium out, which can cause you to feel terrible. Correct too much water with some salty foods or electrolyte caps. Drink too little water, and you’ll also feel terrible. Correct that condition with more liquids. Some folks like to use electrolyte drinks like Nuun or GuBrew to get both the liquid and the electrolyte at the same time. Just pay attention to what you’re putting in to your body and how you feel, and try to correct problems before they become too severe.

 

Signs of dehydration:

Early signs:
Increased thirst; nausea; dry mouth; headache; reduced urine output, with dark yellow urine.

Moderate dehydration signs:
Extreme thirst; dry appearance inside the mouth; decreased urination, or lightheadedness.

Serious dehydration signs:
Cramps, chills and disorientation.

Drink more liquids and take in some electrolytes until you start urinating a more normal color.  If one of your teammates is experiencing serious dehydration, seek medical attention. We will have medical personnel on the course. You will receive contact information in your race packet pickup information. If you do not have cell phone service, contact the nearest race official for assistance.

 

Signs of overhydration:

Bloating, a feeling of fullness in your stomach, nausea, incoherence and disorientation.

Stop drinking, and take in some salt and potassium until you start to feel more “normal”.

 

Cooling Off

The dangers of heat exhaustion are real. Hot and humid days are especially tricky for cooling oneself. Use water to cool yourself, dumping it over your head and neck. Try to avoid getting your shoes wet as this can lead to blisters. Ice in your hat, sports bra or in a neck wrap is also a good way to beat the heat.

 

Finding a cold stream or river to dip your legs or feet into after you run is another good way to bring your core temperature down and help your legs recover. There are many great spots to stop along the Cascade Lakes Highway. The irrigation ditch on Leg #7 is another spot that teams like to take advantage of on Friday.

 

Our EartH2O Water Ambassadors will be on the course looking for runners who need to be cooled off or provided with aid as they run their legs. We’d like to send out a special thank you to all of those teams who stepped up to help keep everyone safe this year. You guys rock!

 

The post The Importance of Hydration appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
Why All The Safety Gear? http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/2013/07/16/why-all-the-safety-gear/ Tue, 16 Jul 2013 18:09:05 +0000 http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/?p=3791     This is what a runner looks like at 150 feet in the headlights when he’s not wearing any safety gear.   Shocking, isn’t it? You might get lucky and catch a reflection off of his water bottle or socks if you’re lucky. It’s pretty clear why it’s so important that you wear reflective gear when you’re out running after dark.   But reflective gear alone still can leave you fairly invisible, as the photo below shows.     This is why we require you to use reflective vests and show them to us at check-in. Running at night without anything to show the cars where you are is quite dangerous. And remember too – when you are out of the van, even if you aren’t running – you are still invisible to cars if you don’t have a vest on. If you’re going to on the road to support your runner, make sure you’ve got good reflective gear on. FootZone in Bend and Fit Right NW in Portland both carry a variety of reflective products that you can use. We are also requiring that each team carry four blinking red lights this year (like these ones) – one to wear on front, and one to wear on back. These lights are especially helpful on the gravel legs (#13 – 17), which tend to get quite dusty as the vans drive by. The red light will cut through the haze and help you be seen. All safety gear should be worn between dusk and dawn.    

The post Why All The Safety Gear? appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
runner_nogear

Can you spot the runner?

 

 

This is what a runner looks like at 150 feet in the headlights when he’s not wearing any safety gear.

 

Shocking, isn’t it? You might get lucky and catch a reflection off of his water bottle or socks if you’re lucky. It’s pretty clear why it’s so important that you wear reflective gear when you’re out running after dark.

 

But reflective gear alone still can leave you fairly invisible, as the photo below shows.

 

reflective

Reflective gear alone still doesn’t quite cut it.

 

runners-vest

Another illustration of why it is wise to wear a reflective vest and not go shirtless.

This is why we require you to use reflective vests and show them to us at check-in. Running at night without anything to show the cars where you are is quite dangerous. And remember too – when you are out of the van, even if you aren’t running – you are still invisible to cars if you don’t have a vest on. If you’re going to on the road to support your runner, make sure you’ve got good reflective gear on. FootZone in Bend and Fit Right NW in Portland both carry a variety of reflective products that you can use.

walkers

Walkers in plenty of reflective gear.

We are also requiring that each team carry four blinking red lights this year (like these ones) – one to wear on front, and one to wear on back. These lights are especially helpful on the gravel legs (#13 – 17), which tend to get quite dusty as the vans drive by. The red light will cut through the haze and help you be seen. All safety gear should be worn between dusk and dawn.

red_light

 

 

The post Why All The Safety Gear? appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
Meet Chief H2O http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/2013/07/15/meet-chief-h2o/ Mon, 15 Jul 2013 14:38:03 +0000 http://www.cascadelakesrelay.com/?p=3783   We are very lucky to have Bob Dolan, a member of the well known Tomahops team, volunteering for us this year as Chief H2O and leader of the Water Ambassador team. Bob will be roving the course, looking for folks in need of a cool glass of water or an “attitude adjustment” – a quick spray down in the heat. And expect to hear some water themed songs blasting from his car…maybe a little “Gimme Some Water” from Eddie Money?   Here’s a little more about Bob:   Some fun facts about me: I have been rock climbing 23 years — since I was 11 years old. I have two broken ankles. I have arthritis in 8 of my 10 fingers I ran track and cross-country back in high school I “ran” the Marine Corps Marathon 6 times while living in DC — only once “officially” I ran 42 miles of the CLR back in 2012 — including an abysmal and stiflingly hot time trial up the back of Bachelor I was an EMT in the District of Columbia back in 2002 – 2004 I have a 10 year old golden retriever named Mel I currently live in Portland Oregon, but I have lived in NY state, North Carolina, Washington DC, and South Carolina as well     What song are you embarrassed to admit you can’t help dancing to? Under Pressure Bowie and Queen   What food do you crave in the wee hours of the night during a relay? PB and J. Oh, and coffee.   What superhero do you sometimes wish you could be? Aquaman of course!   What’s your least favorite running or walking weather? Early morning sunrises in the … Continue reading

The post Meet Chief H2O appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>
bob dolan

 

We are very lucky to have Bob Dolan, a member of the well known Tomahops team, volunteering for us this year as Chief H2O and leader of the Water Ambassador team. Bob will be roving the course, looking for folks in need of a cool glass of water or an “attitude adjustment” – a quick spray down in the heat. And expect to hear some water themed songs blasting from his car…maybe a little “Gimme Some Water” from Eddie Money?

 

Here’s a little more about Bob:

 

Some fun facts about me:
I have been rock climbing 23 years — since I was 11 years old.
I have two broken ankles.
I have arthritis in 8 of my 10 fingers
I ran track and cross-country back in high school
I “ran” the Marine Corps Marathon 6 times while living in DC — only once “officially”
I ran 42 miles of the CLR back in 2012 — including an abysmal and stiflingly hot time trial up the back of Bachelor
I was an EMT in the District of Columbia back in 2002 – 2004
I have a 10 year old golden retriever named Mel
I currently live in Portland Oregon, but I have lived in NY state, North Carolina, Washington DC, and South Carolina as well

 

Chief Refreshment

 

What song are you embarrassed to admit you can’t help dancing to?
Under Pressure Bowie and Queen

 

What food do you crave in the wee hours of the night during a relay?
PB and J. Oh, and coffee.

 

What superhero do you sometimes wish you could be?
Aquaman of course!

 

What’s your least favorite running or walking weather?
Early morning sunrises in the fall.

 

What’s your favorite spot on the CLR course?
THE HILL (aka Leg 19)

 

What’s your favorite post race beverage?
Lemonade!

 

Why do you love volunteering for the CLR?
The camaraderie of your team, the relationships you form with other teams, the mutual suffering, and the fabulously generous and selfless volunteers at exchanges! It all makes for a one-of-a-kind race that is a standout in my experience.

 

tomahops!

The post Meet Chief H2O appeared first on Cascade Lakes Relay | Relay on Us™.

]]>